Trump’s trade talk alarms local Arizona community

Nogales, Arizona is just one city where residents are worried their local economy will suffer if Trump’s trade proposals come to fruition. Chris Dignam reports.

NOGALES, ARIZONA (Reuters) – The tall, rusted ribs of this imposing border fence separate Nogales, Arizona, from Nogales, Mexico, but the two cities are so intertwined that locals call them by a single name, “Ambos Nogales”.

Reuters interviewed more than a dozen workers, employers and city officials here – as well as ordinary residents who live on both sides of the border – and all of them share the same fear: What Trump’s tough – and often unclear – talk on trade with Mexico could do to their community’s economy.

Guillermo Valencia, a long-time customs broker and resident of Nogales, says the worst part is the lack of clarity around Trump’s plan to redo NAFTA, a point only briefly mentioned in his first speech to Congress.

GUILLERMO VALENCIA, CUSTOMS BROKER,

“It’s unsettling. It’s really unsettling that one day you hear something and then the next you hear something else and then at night you hear something else. And the next morning, you wake up and it’s completely different. So it’s a little disturbing.”

John Doyle – the mayor of Nogales, Arizona – held a press conference with the mayor of Nogales, Mexico in January to express their concerns over Trump’s immigration plan and talk of a border tax.

JOHN DOYLE, MAYOR OF NOGALES, ARIZONA,

“You know, what would happen is – on a 20 percent tax – they’re just going to pass it on. And you know who’s going to end up paying it? The people of the United States.” And prices are going to be outrageous.”

Restaurant and store owners, too, say any kind of import tax would make already hard times even harder.

KARLA GALINDO, CO-OWNER OF RANCHO GRANDE RESTAURANT,

“It would be a huge, huge impact. If they would raise those prices, it wouldn’t be convenient to be open anymore.”

Karla Galindo owns the Rancho Grande restaurant on the edge of this Arizona town with her husband. They buy most of their produce from Mexico and says she and other local business owners have already seen their sales fall since Trump took office.

KARLA GALINDO, CO-OWNER OF RANCHO GRANDE RESTAURANT,

“People are getting in their minds, that many bad things will happen and many people are scared.”


Associated Links

  • Trump
  • Twin cities
  • Geography of the United States
  • Geography of Arizona
  • Geography of Mexico
  • Nogales
  • Arizona

  • Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    Leave a Reply