Tag Archives: Sociology

03Aug/15

Suicide is one of the most prolific killers in the UK and world. At the same time there is an immense and resounding silence. Those bereaved are reluctant to talk about it

An emotionally charged discourse on Suicide and the stigma surrounding it with public figure input and general public participation featuring tragic & harrowing real life stories from those who’ve attempted suicide, those who’ve survived and the bereaved. Organised & promoted by Michael Mansfield QC and Anna Christian Events.

SHOWS: ROYAL LEAMINGTON SPA, ENGLAND, UK (ANNA CHRISTIAN EVENTS) – MICHAEL MANSFIELD QC WITH ANNA CHRISTIAN EVENTS DELIVER GROUND BREAKING & UNIQUE EVENT . SOS – SILENCE OF SUICIDE

YVETTE GREENWAY,
“This absolutely unique and groundbreaking event, SOS – Silence of Suicide, which was, well is, the brainchild of Mr Mansfield and er, unfortunately he lost his daughter Anna to suicide not very long ago at all and I know from the emails we’ve received that so many of you are in the same position and for a lot of you you’ve actually maybe attempted suicide yourself and the aim tonight is to get people to talk, to remove the stigma, so that people realise it’s ok, it’s ok to talk”

MICHAEL MANSFIELD QC,
“Well when it started, it started because of my daughter who committed suicide almost 3 months ago now and then I discovered when talking about it that people were cautious to the extent of being silent, that they had sat on all these feelings and for me, slowly to open up to other people and they’d do the same to me and then find actually there’s a ground swell of people out there”

YVETTE GREENWAY,
“It constantly crops up. Fortunately for us, Clarke failed (BACK TO CLOSE SHOT OF YVETTE GREENWAY CONTINUING) in his suicide attempts and I think it’s going to be really useful, I hope it’s going to be really useful for all of you here today to try and understand, if you’re bereaved, maybe what was going on in the minds of the people you’ve lost”

CLARKE CARLISLE,
“You know, there’s just a distinct lack of understanding and there’s little appetite to get into this conversation because people feel awkward about it, you know, people feel a real sense of discomfort about it and we need to break that down, because if we don’t make people feel comfortable about talking about these issues, then how are we going to be able to comfort the sufferer when they’re on the walk that can potentially lead to suicide”

CLARKE CARLISLE,
” It would definitely be that people feel like they’ve been given permission to open up about not only how they feel, but to engage with someone else without that being accusatory or judgemental, just the freedom to discuss your state of mind, your mental well being just as easily as we discuss the weather outside”

CLARKE CARLISLE,
“Now I feel today that I’m as free to talk about suicide and depression, another dirty word, as I am to talk about the weather outside and that’s because er, I’ve dealt, I’ve dealt with the shame and guilt, there’s no shame and guilt involved with depression and with mental ill health as long as you’re willing to acknowledge it as such. You know, the shame and the embarrassment and the guilt comes when you’re still connected to that thought that you have an element of control over it, that it’s something that you should do something about, or as someone who is married to, a child of, a parent of someone with, someone suffering from mental ill health, you still have that ownership, that there is an element of it that you control, you’ve done something wrong and that’s why my son, my daughter, my, my husband, my wife, is depressed – it’s not, it’s an illness.

ROBERT RINDER,
“It’s only by talking about suicide, it’s only by talking by mental health that we start, um, finding a way of finding a remedy and um, it’s one of the last ever meaningful health taboos”

ROBER RINDER,
“For us to start having a louder conversation about it, you know, um, everybody knows the numbers but seemingly nobody wants to talk about it, it’s the largest, one of the largest killers of young men especially, yet nobody talks about it. Um, it’s a postcode lottery like other health issues”

ANONYMOUS MALE SPEAKER,
“The GP didn’t understand that you can be relatively successful and still have an amazing sickness”

ROBERT RINDER,
“So this is a process of turning up the volume it seems to me on an issue which has been too quiet for too long”

ANONYMOUS FEMALE AUDIENCE SPEAKER,
“Sometimes, when so many things are happening, and I feel really, really, hurt, I’m not able to process the pain and the only way that I think that I can, it’s not even thinking, it’s just being driven, a compulsion, to ram my head against the wall or just think of what would happen if I stood in front of a train”

FEMALE AUDIENCE SPEAKER,
“She was beautiful, quirky, funny and we miss her desperately. I haven’t had a voice. There’s no-one to listen. I just hope we can move on and I don’t know what else to say”

ANONYMOUS MALE AUDIENCE SPEAKER,
” I’m not quite sure what I want to say, um short of thanking Clarke and Michael and all the others for their contribution. Um, but I sat there saying, thinking to myself, er, we’re coming up to ten o’clock, wouldn’t it be a shame if we all walked out out

ANONYMOUS MALE AUDIENCE SPEAKER,
“of here and this is the end of this. At the age of eight years old, and having two younger brothers, seven thirty one morning, I heard my father singing. And the song that he sang was God be with you till we meet again. As I say that, I can feel some of the tears welling up in me. Sixty years ago. The evening, later in the evening, my father was found dead, he had poisoned himself . No indication about why and the trauma of an eight year old facing this, trying to put the pieces together, the why. First and foremost some, some of you have reflected that question. What did I do or what could I have done to actually avoid that?

ANONYMOUS FEMALE AUDIENCE SPEAKER,
“I also want to thank Clarke because that was a real insight to possibly what my son was going through and that was just amazing, thank you so much from the bottom of my heart. But what I really wanted to say, is from personal experience, I found that, um, that the whole subject of suicide is so taboo”

ANONYMOUS PERSON,
“I think the outcome will be that people will leave the evening having had a meaningful experience”

ANONYMOUS PERSON,
“There are two aims I want to achieve tonight, one is that people go away feeling they have listened and learned from other people with similar feelings and that in fact they”d like to, as it were, not necessarily create an institution, but create a network, so that they can come together again, not online, but come together in a place and exchange these feelings again and begin to build a body of knowledge and experience which will help people, either people who are contemplating suicide or who have tried suicide or are the relatives of people who have. That’s the real objective”

MICHAEL MANSFIELD QC,
“The real benefit of last night was that the BBC themselves were overwhelmed by the number of people who were tweeting”

ANONYMOUS PERSON,
“But we’re also grateful to actually the hundreds of people who responded, who couldn’t make it tonight, but have responded by telephone, by email over the past weeks and remarkably over the last twenty four hours, because as some of you may know, the BBC very kindly invited me on last night to Newsnight to talk about it”