Tag Archives: Country: United Kingdom

28Mar/17

Mixed messages on eve of Brexit

With a day to go before UK prime minister Theresa May triggers Article 50 to start separation talks with the EU, the Bank of England is warning UK banks to prepare themselves in case of a disorderly Brexit. But, as Ivor Bennett reports, the eve of Brexit also attracts a vote of confidence from Qatar as its sovereign wealth fund pledges over $6 billion in investment in Britain. Continue reading

28Mar/17

The new generation of start-up Brits living in Berlin ponder their future ahead of Article 50 trigger day

As Britain prepares to trigger divorce proceedings with the European Union, launching two years of negotiations that will reshape the future of the country and Europe, Britons living in the German capital take stock of where this leaves them.

Continue reading

27Mar/17

The road to Brexit – a timeline of events as May prepares to trigger Article 50

The road to Brexit has been a tumultuous one, with protests and lawsuits and a bitterly divided country. British Prime Minister Theresa May will trigger Article 50 on Wednesday (March 29) which means official talks on Britain leaving the European Union can begin.

VILLACOUBLAY AIRPORT, NEAR PARIS, FRANCE (REUTERS) – On Wednesday (March 29) British Prime Minister Theresa May will trigger Article 50, which will formally kickstart the process of Britain leaving the European Union.

It comes nine months after 2016’s June 23 referendum in which Britons voted to leave 52 percent to 48 percent.

The result divided the country, with remain voters feeling their wishes and concerns are being ignored.

The Supreme Court ruled earlier this year that parliament must approve May triggering Article 50. This angered the Leave camp, which believed pro-Europe campaigners were trying to subvert the result of the referendum.

Last weekend, leaders of the remaining 27 states met without departing Britain for a summit that they hope could relaunch the Union in the city where it was founded 60 years earlier. The Treaty of Rome, creating the European Economic Community (EEC) of France, Germany, Italy and the Benelux, was signed on March 25, 1957.

21Mar/17

After tasting success at home, Malawi winery looks to foreign markets

Linga fruit wines are produced from eight types of fruits locally grown by smallholder farmers in Malawi. The fruit wine brand started in 2006, has grown popular at home over the years and has now found its market in the United Kingdom with prospects the demand could grow to other countries in the future.

Continue reading

20Mar/17

Worried EU nationals struggle with UK residency rules ahead of Brexit

As British Prime Minister Theresa May announces March 29 as the day she will trigger Article 50, officially kick-starting the process for the UK to leave the European Union, EU nationals living in Britain are seriously worried about their future status as they grapple with complex British residency rules – which often results in rejection.

Continue reading

14Mar/17

Brexit batters pound, Fed nerves hit stocks

Sterling has slipped to an eight week low against the dollar, as some investors turned nervous over a second Scottish independence referendum and the triggering of Brexit negotiations. But, as David Pollard reports, the Fed – and an expected U.S. rate rise – remained the main focus, with worries over elections in France and the Netherlands appearing to recede. Continue reading

13Mar/17

Is Brexit trigger about to be pulled?

MPs are expected to reject Lords’ amendments to the Brexit bill as they debate it for a second time, paving the way for Prime Minister Theresa May to trigger Article 50 as early as Tuesday. Continue reading

22Feb/17

British suicide bomber in Iraq had won compensation for Guantanamo stay

British militant Abu-Zakariya al-Britani who blew himself up in Iraq had won compensation for his stay at Guantanamo Bay, security sources say.

(SOCIAL MEDIA WEBSITE) – An Islamic State suicide bomber from Britain who blew himself up in an attack on Iraqi forces this week had been given compensation for his detention in the Guantanamo Bay military prison, Western security sources said on Wednesday (February 22).

Islamic State militants said Abu-Zakariya al-Britani, a British citizen who was originally known as Ronald Fiddler and then cast himself as Jamal Udeen al-Harith, detonated a car bomb at an Iraqi army base southwest of Mosul this week.

The militants also released a photograph of the smiling bomber surrounded by wires in the seat of what appeared to be the car in which he blew himself up.

The photograph was published on Dawaall al-Haq, a website that describes itself as a non-affiliated news agency. Dawaall al-Haq publishes content relating to the Islamic State and other militant groups.

The Islamic State statements could not be independently verified by Reuters but three Western security sources said it was highly likely that Britani was the bomber and now dead.

Britain made a civil damages settlement with British former Guantanamo Bay inmates in 2010 but did not disclose the size of the payouts, citing confidentiality agreements, then-Justice Secretary Kenneth Clarke told parliament at the time.

The Daily Mail reported that al-Britani had been awarded $1.25 million by the British government after claiming British agents knew or were complicit in his alleged mistreatment.

Originally from the northern English city of Manchester, he converted to Islam in his 20s. He was detained in Afghanistan by U.S. special forces and taken to Guantanamo in 2002.

He was released in 2004 after the government of then-Prime Minister Tony Blair lobbied for his release. He later travelled to Syria to fight with Islamic State.

Britain’s foreign ministry declined to comment on the death of al-Britani but said it had advised for some time against all travel to Syria and large parts of Iraq.