First penis transplant in the United States to be performed within a year

Surgeons at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine are hoping to within a year perform the first penis transplant in the United States on a young soldier injured by a bomb explosion in Afghanistan, the New York Times reported.

US (Next Media) – Surgeons at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine are hoping to within a year perform the first penis transplant in the United States on a young soldier injured by a bomb explosion in Afghanistan, the New York Times reported.

The surgery is experimental, and doctors at Johns Hopkins have been given permission to perform 60 transplants.

According to U.S. Department of Defense Trauma Registry figures cited by the New York Times, as many as 1,367 soldiers suffered wounds to the genitals in Iraq and Afghanistan after being injured by IEDs between 2001 and 2013. Some lost all or part of their penises and/or testicles.

In the first penis transplant in the U.S., a the penis of a recently deceased donor will be removed and carefully dissected to keep its blood vessels, nerves and connecting structures intact.

Then surgeons will then connect the nerves, veins and arteries of the donor’s penis to the recipient’s correlating tissue and stitch them together under a microscope.

The recipient’s nerves will grow into the transplant at a rate of about one inch per month, which means it could take several months for the patient to recover sexual function.

If however the transplant fails, the donor’s penis will be removed, leaving the recipient in the same condition as before the surgery.

Among the risks are bleeding and infection. The patient will also have to take anti-rejection medicines for all his life, which could increase his chances of developing cancer.

Only two other penis transplants have been performed: a failed one in China in 2006 and a successful one in South Africa in 2014.

The estimated cost of the procedure is $200,000 to $400,000 per operation.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:

1. Soldiers injured in the pelvic area in Afghanistan and Iraq

2. A donor’s penis being removed with its blood vessels, nerves and connecting structures intact

3. The nerves, veins and arteries of the donor’s penis connected to the recipient’s correlating tissue

4. A catheter draining urine

5. The recipient’s nerves growing into the transplant at a rate of one inch a month, the recipient recovering sexual function after few months

6. Unsuccessful penis transplant in China in 2006, successful penis transplant in South Africa in 2014

VOICEOVER (in English):

First penis transplant in the U.S. could help wounded soldiers

“From 2001 to 2013 as many as 1,367 soldiers suffered wounds to the genitals in Iraq and Afghanistan after being injured by IEDs. Some lost all or part of their penises or testicles.

“In the first penis transplant in the U.S., a donor’s penis will be removed and carefully dissected to keep its blood vessels, nerves and connecting structures intact.

“Then surgeons will connect the nerves, veins and arteries of the donor’s penis to the recipient’s correlating tissue and stitch it together under a microscope.”

“After the surgery, a catheter will be left in place to drain urine for the first few weeks until the patient develops the urinary function.”

“The recipient’s nerves will grow into the transplant at a rate of about one inch per month, which means it could take several months for the patient to recover sexual function.”

“Only two other penis transplants have been made around the world: a failed one in China in 2006 and a successful one in South Africa in 2014.”

SOURCES: The New York Times, TIME

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