Super Bowl ads getting too expensive – Adweek

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Some companies don’t mind shelling out $5 million for a thirty second spot during the Super Bowl, but others find cheaper ways to advertise. Bobbi Rebell reports.

REUTERS / KIA / GENERAL MOTORS / BUDWEISER / AVOCADOS FROM MEXICO / TIFFANY / INTEL
Some companies don’t mind shelling out a record $5 million for a thirty second spot during the Super Bowl.

Kia Motors America COO Michael Sprague:

MICHAEL SPRAGUE, COO AND EVP, KIA MOTORS AMERICA

“We wouldn’t be coming back for the eight straight year, if we didn’t see a return on our investment.”

But others, like Heinz, are opting out of paying for Super Bowl TV spots. They still find many creative ways to milk the sports phenomenon, though, says Tony Case an executive editor at Adweek. For example, Heinz came up with a change.org petition to declare the Monday after the Super Bowl a national holiday.

ADWEEK, EXECUTIVE EDITOR, TONY CASE,
“The price, every year, keeps going up and up and up. There has always been an assumption that there is going to be high demand for Super Bowl ads, because this is a huge audience, one of the biggest live audiences of the year. However, more companies have started stepping back, looking at their investments, sort of crunching the numbers, and saying, ‘Hm… is this really worth the money?'”

They key – get attention and stand out from the pack. Case points out that one of this year’s main themes is immigration, featured in a sixty-second, movie-like Budweiser commercial. But, as is always the case, keeping audiences laughing is a winner so look for ads to look to score by making fans smile.


Associated Links

  • Kia
  • Kia Motors
  • BUDWEISER
  • Kraft Heinz Co
  • ADWEEK
  • Intel
  • National Football League
  • Professional sports leagues in the United States
  • American Football League
  • Super Bowl
  • Advertising

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